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RIP, Ruth Bader Ginsburg: I'll Forever be Obsessed!

 Some of you may remember my friend from Boston, Sue, who doesn't crochet but comes to CGOA conferences with her sister to hang out with me! She called me recently to share a fantastic story. Her cousin, Sarah, who established M.M. LaFleur, received a request from RBG herself to make a jabot in the style of company's upscale designs! 


Sarah LaFleur, CEO & Miyako Nakamura, Co-Founder

"M.M.LaFleur is built on a core belief: When women succeed in the workplace, the world becomes a better place. Founder & CEO Sarah LaFleur was once your typical woman in finance whose closet was packed with blah-feeling pantsuits. Back then, she dreamed of a more practical, inspired wardrobe for herself and all professional women.

She teamed up with Co-founders Narie Foster and Miyako Nakamura, and they launched M.M.LaFleur in 2011. Their goal: to help women harness the power of self-presentation, and to rethink the shopping process altogether. Not only do we design our own collection, but we integrate personal styling into the MM experience. We know you have #BetterThingsToDo than worry about what to wear, so our mission is to take the work out of dressing for work."

Representative of the tailoring for which MM LaFleur is Known 

Miyuko: "I wanted to make sure that our collar was representative of the tailoring that we do at M.M., and I landed on the construction of a men’s shirt collar.

For the design, I used three ivory-colored jacquards to symbolize the familial layers that underpinned Justice Ginsburg’s life. The top layer was a textured jacquard that represented the Justice herself; below was a polka-dotted jacquard that resembled a man’s tie, which represented her husband Marty; and beneath, two layers of floral jacquard represented their children, who were blossoming under them. We felt that the collar articulated how a strong familial bond can help a woman achieve greatness at work."

Quote from Marty Ginsburg, Ruth's husband and partner: "I have been supportive of my wife since the beginning of time; and she has been supportive of me. It's not sacrifice, it's family."


                                               Miyako fitting Justice Ginsburg-October 2020


To learn more about M.M. LaFleur and its story.


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