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Celebrating the Letter "Y" During National Crochet Month!

I have a little fan club in the Junior Kindergarden(JK) room at  my grandchildren's school! Although they are not in teacher, Mrs. B's class this year, I was invited to come back for my 2nd annual presentation on the letter Y; and that stands for "yarn."

Conveniently, the JK students reach the letter Y in their studies of the alphabet during March; so it becomes my way to celebrate and open young minds to the mysteries of crochet! This year I spoke to about 30 four-year-olds; two combined classes; mainly because I got caught in horrible traffic by the State Fairgrounds and was late!

Needless to say there was much enthusiasm in the room! Aiming to speak to their interests andattention span, my theme was to show how tools like the hook are used to loop yarn, which starts with the letter Y, to create odd and interesting projects. I compared and showed big yarn  (cable cord) and little yarn (thread);  big hooks and little hooks; big projects and little projects. 

Wearing the Flamingo Necklace
Big Hook/Little Hook


Big Project: Queen of Crochet ~ A Self-Portrait


Wearing the Tree Hat: circa 1975
Intrigued by the light-up Hook

My Special Hook Collection in my Crown Hook Holder
Some examples of Mini-Yarnbombing.

Rock of Ages

Heartrock Hotel

Many Things to Look at

It was a cold & rainy day, so I didn't get to participate in the "yarn bombing" in the school yard, but the clouds lifted in the afternoon and the kids were busy enhancing their environment. I left yarn motifs and a tapestry crochet square in the school colors for them to use.

Yarnbombing in the school yard:





I'm already invited to come back next year for the Letter Y during National Crochet Month. I can' twait!!

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