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Book Review: Fair Isle Tunisian Crochet by Brenda Bourg



Brenda Bourg has proven what I've believed for a long time: "There are no limits to the creative possibilities of crochet!" Not only does one learn Tunisian crochet in her new book, but  also  how to expand Tunisian crochet skills by working in two colors to create the exquisite Fair Isle look.

Annabel Bag

Brenda uses the Tunisian Knit Stitch throughout the book, and introduces the reader to the use of the Tunisian hook with a cable. Thus, larger projects are possible including sweater designs. The sixteen projects in the book include a wide range of pattern-making experiences from boot cuffs and head bands to sweaters and afghans. Brenda also recommends the use of a nice selection of yarns for the projects affording the crocheter the opportunity to experience the feel and function of many yarns. She gives advise on substituting yarns, as well.

Elish Afghan
In the extensive tutorial section, the author has thought of everything that the crocheter needs to achieve success in this unique crochet technique. She encourages readers to experiment with their own favorite colors; and as a bonus, she has included an informative section on color coordination.

Ivanna Mitts
Brenda's love of her home state of Colorado and in particular the glories of the Rocky Mountains shines through in the lovely photos included in the book. She writes about her pioneering forebears and the history of Clear Creek History Park where the photo shoot took place. Through the photos, the reader can easily get caught up in the romance of this historic place and the awe-inspiring ambience Brenda has used to showcase her designs. Any crocheter interested in exploring Tunisian crochet further is sure to be inspired to create something beautiful!

Published by Stackpole Books, Fair Isle Tunisian Crochet retails here and is available on Amazon.

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