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#6KCBWDAY4 ~ Bags of Fun



#6KCBWDAY4 ~Time to delve into that most treasured collection of tools, notions and oddments as you are asked to spill the contents of your knitting or crochet bag, caddy or other method of organisation and put your crafting unmentionables on display. You may wish to talk about your bag of crocheting tools as a whole, or delve deep into the contents of your knitting caddy and talk about the contents each in turn.

I do treasure my everyday bag and its everyday basic contents. What's not to treasure? I use my crochet tools everyday and always have at least 3 projects going! 

The bag is ready to go at all times!

However, I'd like to share some special things that I REALLY, REALLY treasure that are not necessarily in my bag.



In the photo there's a tubular wooden box with lid and I have no idea what it was originally used for, but it is an antique. I keep small odds 'n ends in it such as thimbles. The vintage sock darning tool is so lovingly used and deliciously smooth. Propped upon the darning ball is an antique pin cushion/ thimble holder crocheted upon a wish bone...classic 1940s crochet work! There is also a felted pincushion that is modern but adorable! I crocheted the fuchsia flower with beads and use it as a scissor fob.

There's an antique sewing bird with mini-pincushion on top that attaches to the sewing machine or table. An adorable tape measure in the shape of a shoe is labeled "three-feet-in-one." I've included my two favorite hooks in this photo. On the left is a gift from Noreen Crone Findlay handcarved by her with a hand-painted Queen, crown and bead necklace on the top. In 20th anniversary colors, the other hook is the 2014  CGOA commemorative hook. It sports an emerald jewel and metal tag that says CGOA 2014.

My mother was an antique shop owner and Garage Sale Queen. Two of my very best gifts ever were from her and they are certainly  treasures!


Antique Sampler Book, dating 1890s
My mom found this sampler book in a drawer of a chest that she bought from a garage sale. A surprise bonus for sure! She paid  $50.00 for it and was so worried that she paid too much. It is appraised at about $1,000!


This is a box of needlework items that she bought at a garage sale. It tells the tale of a needleworker's life. The treasured tools she used are all here in a simple department store box (Wolf & Dessauer from my home town of Ft. Wayne, Indiana). Included are bone and steel hooks, crochet on rick rack; pieces of cotton fabric with edgings and the instructions written right on the fabric with an ink pen; a bar of soap covered in a filet crochet turtle with draw-string opening; some wooden spools of thread, small flower motifs and rolls and rolls of edgings; and notes on scrap paper to pass on instructions.

I have kept this box intact exactly as I received it twenty years ago.

The soap-covered turtle

Edging on cotton or linen with instructions

"Hat" pincushion

Needlecase
Needlecase: inside view



Crochet edging on fabric

Insructions from or for Hazel












Comments

Breathing Life said…
Very unique things for certain. Love the note at the end.
Joyce Tucker said…
I love all your wonderful items!

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