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Book Review: Tunisian Shawls by Sharon H. Silverman


Tunisian Shawls
Having reviewed more than one of Sharon’s books, I could predict that this latest one is a worthwhile addition to anyone’s crochet library. Especially suited to those who want to experience Tunisian crochet and learn more about it, she includes 8 different shawls using yarn ranging from fine to bulky. A nice touch is the variety of shawls for all seasons. You’ll be kept busy crocheting and learning throughout the year!


Hot Pink Lace, Skill Level: Easy
The book's photos are colorful and large which helps sometimes when interpreting a pattern. Also included are clear illustrations of the stitches which is a benefit if you are trying Tunisian crochet for the first time. I always enjoy having the weight number for the yarn used; it allows me to be a little creative and choose alternate yarns with accuracy.

Fair Isle Winter Capelet
I am quite impressed by the Fair Isle technique in this capelet. Intermediate crochet skills are suggested to make it, and a chart is also included to help sail through the pattern with confidence.

Cables & Heart
The General Instructions section includes clear photos of both Tunisian and general crochet stitches plus blocking instructions. Also listed are resources for the yarns used in the project photos. Bravo, Sharon, you’ve given us another reason to love Tunisian crochet!

As we’ve come to expect with the products from Leisure Arts, this Tunisian Shawl booklet is a quality product and is available for $12.99.



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