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Hooks to Heal: Participants Wanted for a New Health Survey!

Wednesday, June 25, 2014




Kathryn Vercillo well known as the #crochetblogger at Crochet Concupiscense is fast becoming the expert when it comes to the health benefits of crochet as she studies to become a psychologist. Her book Crochet Saved My Life has been reviewed positively across many media site. If you happened to miss it, I hope you will look back and read my review.


Kathryn has now launched a new crochet health survey  to study how crochet heals people. This is a 27-question survery (mostly multiple choice) designed to gather detailed information about the physical and mental health issues that are helped through crochet work and to what degree the craft is helpful.

In her book Kathryn shares her own story of crocheting to heal from chronic depression. She also interviews two dozen other women who share their stories of hooking to heal. In addition, she aggregates the available research into crafting to heal.

Several formal studies have been conducted that show crochet to be healing. The new study is designed to add to the available information on this topic. One unique thing about it is that the study focuses specifically on crochet as opposed to lumping it in with other crafts. Another unique feature is that it goes beyond asking the question “does crochet help?” (because we know that it does) and explores how it helps, to what extent and for what symptoms.

Kathryn Vercillo will do an in-depth analysis of the results of this study. She will use that information to publish a full report on the health benefits of crafting. She will also use the information in future publications and it will serve as the foundation for continued research into this important topic.

A survey like this has the potential to lead to a number of benefits including:


  •        Credibility to get crochet into more settings including hospitals, recovery centers, in-patient therapy groups, prisons and schools
  •          Information that can be given to doctors and therapists to help them understand how crochet can heal
  •          Help for individuals who want to learn how crochet can help them heal
  •          Lays the groundwork for additional research opportunities into the topic
You can help support the craft of crochet by contributing your response to this new survey. The survey is available here. https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/crochetsaveslives.



Comments

Thanks for the support. I love your intro in this post!!

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