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Cancer & Crochet Support Group

Monday, October 28, 2013
Soon it will be one year that I started my volunteer job as coordinator of a Cancer & Crochet Support group at my local hospital. Today, I want to celebrate the life of one of our members who died last week. Even though Judy was in hospice, she continued work on her goal of making 100 caps for the premature babies at the hospital. She reached and exceeded the goal with 125 hats! During her last ten days of life, she attended a special event hosted by my CGOA chapter in her wheel chair with oxygen; she also came to the support group. She was one strong and determined woman and we will miss her terribly!

I've long known the value of crochet as a healing tool and a method of relaxation. I reviewed books that cover this topic beautifully: Crochet Saved My Life and Contemplative Crochet. Recently my friend Rita, an art therapist, came to share with the group.

Rita, Art Therapist, leading group
This was the group's first attempt at thread crochet and after they got over the initial shock of the small hook and tiny thread, they began to enjoy making the little pouch.

Rita guided them through thinking about their feelings about the group and they were spot-on in the comments they shared: "I love this group; we have become friends; I don't want to miss it; we share so much with each other in a safe environment; we are learning so much; My brother is visiting and I told him I couldn't miss this group and he'd have to entertain himself." This group is so important to me and a perfect fit. I love forward to our sessions together. Combining my nursing background with my love of teaching crochet allows me to lead this group with confidence and most of all to feel good about making an important contribution to their healing process.

The next week several of the women returned with their pouch worked through row 10. They were all stuck on a special "cross" stitch. I helped them get over that hump and they were on their way again. By next week I should see a few finished pouches. Rita has suggested that they write their thoughts and feelings on little pieces of paper to keep in the pouches. I thank Rita for taking time out of her busy day to bring a soothing ambiance to our group!

I've written before about my love of photos of crocheting hands. Although I can't show their faces. I think the hands of the women in my group tell it all.



Comments

Gabli said…
This is wonderful. The work you do with the group is inspiring! You have a wonderful heart and I hope to one day be able to do the same!

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